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Found 7 results

  1. Candace recently discusses “Framing Britney Spears” on her show. She also discusses Chrissy Teigen and her resurfaced tweets that encourage bullying and self-harm. What are your thoughts on Chrissy’s past tweets? Are they something you believe she has grown from or do you believe she’s that same person and deserves to be a result of the cancel culture that she has helped contribute to? A lot to digest here.
  2. Hey girls - what’s your Lana album ranking from best to worst? And why is your #1 Lana album your #1? And why is your #7 your #7 (I am counting Paradise and BYD as separate albums in this scenario 💅) here’s mine 1 - Chemtrails Over The Country Club. (I can’t say or not say if this is even her best, but I feel like where I am in life I relate to it the most and white dress really hit me 😭 2 - Paradise 3 - Norman 4 - Honeymoon 5 - Ultra Violence 6 - Lust for Life 7 - Born to Die (this is a good album but I feel like I only like a handful of tracks. Carmen / Dark paradise are just way too OTT for me and I find the lyrics to be v immature. However BTD the song & Radio are some of my all time faves ever from her). Now spill Related:
  3. Variety posted a rather interesting review of ‘The New York Times Presents: Framing Britney Spears’. Firstly, those that are anxious that the documentary will be very one sided i.e pro-conservatorship and pro-team con, it’s not. So, we can breath a huge sign of relief. If anything it tips ever so slightly in the other direction. The reviewer Daniel D’addario’s overall take is a positive one (Britney matters), and suggests the documentary is fairly “balanced” in its depiction of her current situation (i.e the conservatorship). But, with regards to how the public (fans included) treat her (now and in the past), as an artist and human being, this is the biggest tragedy of all. Here are main takeaways from the article of what we can expect to see in the documentary. Spoiler: If you don’t want know anything about what’s to come, stop reading now. 1. Brit is presented as both a fascinating example of how our culture treats those we allegedly love, and as a deeply sad case of abuse. 2. Audio of Timberlake speaking crudely on the radio about Spears (no doubt about her virginity) appears on the documentary. 3. They use footage of 10 year old Britney singing “Love Can Build a Bridge” on “Star Search”. 4. Fe speaks extensively (and lovingly) about Brit the artist, and human being. She’s there to humanise Brit. 5. Hosts of a podcast (likely Britney’s Gram) discuss theories about Spears’ legal situation. 6. The documentary touches on a number of conspiracy theories that “fans” obsess over (like Britney communicating in code). Implying, the online “fandom” is as damaging to Britney the “star” as the conservatorship is. 7. The conservatorship is openly discussed, with commentary from all sides (see below), including FreeBritney fans, (FreeBritney advocate Leanne Simmons is already confirmed). 8. The conservatorship appears to be part of a lifelong pattern of “misuse” in Spears life, and career. $$$$ 9. There is an interview with a Conservatorship lawyer who had been on, and later rejoined, Spears’ father’s legal team. Likely Vivian Lee Thoreen (it couldn’t be Andrew Wallet, or could it)? 10. The documentary reproduces footage from “For The Record” of Spears yearning to be freed from the conservatorship, and being sad. 11. Brit’s silence on her situation is its own tragedy, because it would appear that the situation has caused the silence. She has a story to tell (like her contemporaries). But she is the only one who can tell it (like her contemporaries). 12. Finally, the article/documentary claims that fame was another kind of captivity for Spears, albeit one with more “liberties”. Suggesting, that before her “controlling” father, the culture that idolised her had kept her captive too. Namely, the public never saw her as a real person. Just a puppet, and someone to project on. https://variety.com/2021/tv/reviews/framing-britney-spears-review-fx-1234892912/ The 75 minute documentary airs Friday February 5th, at 10 PM, on FX and Hulu.
  4. "Trapped." (two minute read) Within the span of three years [2018-2020] Grande has accomplished any recent female artists would've done, releasing three albums consecutively. And today, she delivered her newest offering in follow-up to her side jobs with Bieber and Gaga, to named a few of her collaborators. The sixth installment of Grande's brand kicked off with the release of title track single, positions. It introduces a sultry take of God is a woman, while dressed up as the first lady of the White House for appropriation. Sonically, the lead song follows the acoustic elements of Stuck With U. And between the two, positions is obviously the underdog. The obvious influences of hip-hop genre to Grande has became prominent overtime. While the trap sound is gradually becoming the new pop trend, the overused of these style and production are what the album's greatest issues. Most of the tracks end up having a very similar sound. And although the production is ambitiously mixed with other instrumentations, that effort is not not enough to rescue the potential bangers; shut up and love language for example. As Grande started to drawn herself into songwriting and self-producing, positions demonstrates the lack of progressive direction. Most tracks share identical songwriting style and analogies of being too conversational. The absence of depth and figurative topics make the album's narrative less enjoyable despite the insightful opening tracks. Even the use of vile words sound rushed, and generalizing a very ridiculous idea. The production efforts with some of the tracks exceptionally stand out, but the lyrics are too off-putting to reconsider them as bangers. shut up and my hair embrace this common flaw, and both share an awkward hook: How you been spending your time? (How?) How you be using your tongue? (How?) You be so worried 'bout mine (Mine) Can't even get yourself none You know you sound so dumb (So dumb, so dumb) You know you sound so dumb (So dumb) (lyrics taken from "shut up") Grande's enunciation is one of her signatures. And despite the severity of mumbling, it surprisingly suits the some of the tracks such as 34+35, just like magic and nasty, heightening the swag-gy and playful attitudes. Still, the subtlety of her pronunciation is one of the things she has to improve regardless. Moreover, some of the tracks still manage to showcase greater potentials; like the closing ballad, pov, a reminder of Grande's soaring vocal abilities that's missing in the album, and the flirtatious take to 7 rings, 34+35, that implies a chant-y and clever chorus. Disappointingly, she has failed to redeem herself from the featured track's disaster since the Sweetener era. Like the monotonous attempt of the Weeknd's off the table, and the predictable rap verse of Cat, motive ends up one of those urban songs. safety net shares a different light though, arguably one of the best tracks but featured a wrong collaborator. The lack of theme also makes the record indistinctive. Take the kinky and **** appeal of Dangerous Woman, the recovery and healing of Sweetener, and the romantic frustrations of thank u, next. positions' somewhat started with another **** attempt she's been doing over the years. It has no identity or story to begin with, to captivate it's listeners. Grande is probably at the point of comforting herself to a follow up, instead of finding a progressive sound. It isn't a bad thing at all, reinventing artistic image is not a requirement for any artists to be interesting. Some artists have a more tentative core, while others are conventional. In general, releasing positions is a very brave decision to follow up thank, u next, considering how big her fifth album has become. It's probably not a highlight in her career, but still a tolerating gift to those who enjoy her discography. Btw, here's my personal ranking of each tracks: 1. positions 2. 34+35 3. pov 4. safety net 5. just like magic 6. nasty 7. west side 8. love language 9. six thirty 10. obvious 11. motive 12. my hair 13. shut up 14. off the table positions: 4/10 These are just my thoughts, but y'all think of the album? Related:
  5. **My first review** don't attack me S Club 7's very own Rachel Stevens' solo career should have made pop history. Taking after Kylie Minogue, she dove right into the trance-synth pop genre and mastered it on her second album. Her first attempt at solo music was her debut album, Funky Dory, a mediocre album that included the Britney reject stand-out track titled "Sweet Dreams My LA Ex". But Rachel Stevens didn't want to be mediocre, she would enlist the help of Richard X and Xenomania, the Music God's in charge of most of Girls Aloud and Kylie Minogue's catalogues to record new music. With the release of her new single "Some Girls", Rachel was finally standing out amongst the crowd and demonstrating her full potential. The track proved to be magic and peaked at #2 on the UK top charts. The single was included on a re-release of her debut album, Funky Dory, but was also added onto her second album, "Come and Get It" which would soon prove to be pop perfection start to finish. After the success of Some Girls, Rachel knew what direction she wanted to take her next album. "Come and Get It" was released on in October 2005. The album received critical acclaim and would eventually make it onto the "100 albums to listen to before you die" list. The album proved to be ahead of its time and inherently influential. Stevens would make the most confident tracks of her career with the dazzling "Crazy Boys", a song with a thumping synth beat and ****, bold, confident talk-sing vocals by Ms. Stevens where she declares "For you I'd wait forever, nobody does it better". With "I Will Be There", another album standout and what some argue is the best song on the album, Stevens sings over an 80's synth pop production that sounds incredibly magnetic and electric. Stand-out tracks like "I Will Be There", "Crazy Boys", "Funny How" make you feel like you are at a disco that is raining down glitter and diamonds. That is the imagery that comes to mind with most of "Come and Get It". Stevens slows it down on the album half-way through with the ballad "Nothing Good About This Goodbye", a breakup song where she laments her regrets for her ex-lover. It's another standout track and would have been a good final single off of the album instead of the up-beat pop track "I Said Never Again (But Here We are)" that performed mildly well on the UK charts peaking at #12 and had a cute music video to go along with it. "I Said Never Again" is one of the album's more generic tracks and I can understand why they released it as a single but the album tracks are loads more interesting and magical than the latter. Unfortunately, for whatever reason, the album underperformed and debuted at #28 on the UK charts. Rachel released her last single from the album, "I Said Never Again (But Here We Are)" in October 2005 and she was never heard from again in the music realm... which is an utter damn shame. The album was revolutionary and influenced albums like "Dignity" by Hilary Duff, "X" and "Aphrodite" by Kylie Minogue, and in my opinion, you an hear it's sounds replicated and mastered on "Heaven On Earth" from Britney's Blackout. If you haven't listened to Come and Get It by Rachel Stevens, I highly suggest adding the album and giving it a listen from start to finish. You will not regret it. STAND OUT TRACKS TO LISTEN TO: So Good Crazy Boys I Will Be There Nothing Good About This Goodbye Some Girls Funny How Dumb Dumb
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